Exploring research, technology, and learning in the longevity era

October 21, 2019 | 8:00 - 3:30PM | Grappone Center, Concord, NH

Each new era brings with it possibilities for change and growth; the emerging longevity era is no exception. As we are living longer than ever before; the world around us offers unparalleled opportunity to test old assumptions, make new discoveries and modify our ecosystems to support our changing needs. In Northern New England, our institutions of higher education, research laboratories, tech companies, and housing innovators are leading the way in exploring these possibilities. They are developing revolutionary approaches to learning and living in later life that enhance health and well-being. They are:

  • Co-developing, with older people, technologies to improve safety, health and ease of living;
  • Creating age-diverse learning and living environments that foster bi-directional learning;
  • Offering experiential learning opportunities to health professionals and older adults;
  • Piloting evidence-based geriatric care initiatives that bend the cost curve and meet the Triple Aim;
  • Expanding the capacity of our workforce to meet the needs of rural older adults through interdisciplinary geriatrics training that leverages new technologies;
  • Leading research to end Alzheimer’s disease and delay age-related health issues;
  • Using artificial intelligence to help people self-monitor their health and care;
  • Providing policy analyses and program evaluation to contribute to the body of evidence on policy and program success; and
  • Leading efforts to reframe our ageist culture to one of inclusion of all ages.

Alice Bonner, PhD, RN
Senior Advisor, Aging, Innovation, Institute for Healthcare Improvement and Former Secretary of Executive Office of Elder Affairs, Commonwealth of Massachusetts

We are excited to announce our Keynote speaker is Dr. Alice Bonner!

Dr. Bonner’s work focuses on supporting and empowering older adults to be able to age in their communities, creating and improving age-friendly health systems, promoting dementia-friendly communities and support for caregivers of individuals living with dementia, working to prevent elder abuse and mistreatment, and advocating to end elder homelessness.

Previously, Dr. Bonner was Secretary of the Executive Office of Elderly Affairs for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Her research interests include quality and safety in nursing centers, falls prevention, improving dementia care and reducing unnecessary antipsychotic medication use, and reducing avoidable hospitalizations.

We are thrilled to have her join us at the Age of Possibilities Summit!

Agenda

8:00 – 9:00 Registration and Light Breakfast
9:00 – 9:15 Welcome & Opening Remarks
Jess Maurer

Executive Director, Maine Council on Aging
Project Manager, Tri-State Learning Collaborative on Aging
9:15 – 10:15 Keynote-  Aging is Cool: Everyone is doing it
Alice Bonner, PhD, RN
Senior Advisor, Aging, Innovation, Institute for
Healthcare Improvement
Former Secretary of Executive Office of Elder Affairs,Commonwealth of Massachusetts
10:15 – 10:30 Break
10:30 – 11:30 Morning Plenary Panel- Healthy Aging and Research

Panelists:
Allison Wilder, Associate Professor, University of New Hampshire

10:15 – 10:30 Break and Get Lunch
11:45 – 12:45 Lunch Plenary Panel- Healthcare Workforce

Panelists:
Jennifer Gunderman-King, Workforce Development Teach Lead, AHEC, Assistant Clinical Professor, University of New England
Susan Huard, President, Manchester Community College

12:45 – 1:00 Break
1:00 – 2:00 Breakout Session One (for details about each session, click on the “Breakout 2” Tab)

A1. Dementia Research

A2. Geriatric Workforce Enhancement Program: Making Healthcare Better by Engaging Patients and Family Members

A3. Age-Friendly Healthcare

A4. Experiential Learning: Identifying opportunities and collaborators for service learning in fall prevention

A5. Using Qualitative Research to Understand Older People’s Quality of Life and Informal Caregiver Experiences

2:00 – 2:15 Break
2:15-3:15 Breakout Session Two (for details about each session, click on the “Breakout 2” Tab)

B1. Engagement & Meaning-Making in Later Life: Opportunities in Work, Education and Research

B2. Empowering and enabling aging-in-place through digital technologies

B3. Engaging Older Adults in Research: Examples from the Field

B4. Putting Data and Research to work

B5. Hearing and Experiencing the Untold Story

3:15 – 3:30 Concluding Thoughts

Agenda

1:00 – 2:00 Breakout Session One

A1. Dementia Research

Description Coming Soon

Presenters:
Barbara Colombo, PhD. Associate Professor, Head of Neuroscience Lab, Champlain College

A2. Geriatric Workforce Enhancement Program: Making Healthcare Better by Engaging Patients and Family Members

The Geriatric Workforce Enhancement Program provides funding to establish and operate geriatric education centers that will work to equip the primary care workforce and develop a healthcare workforce that maximizes patient and family engagement and improves health outcomes for older adults by integrating geriatrics and primary care. Special emphasis is on providing the primary care workforce with the knowledge and skills to care for older adults and partnering with community-based organizations to address gaps in healthcare for older adults, promote age-friendly health systems and dementia-friendly communities, and address the social determinants of health. Each site that receives the funding develops its own program. Join us to learn more about how we are implementing the program in Maine.

Presenters: 
Clifford Singer, MD. Chief, Geriatric Mental Health and Neuropsychiatry Northern Light Health Acadia Hospital
Susan Wehry, MD. Chief of Geriatrics, Division of Geriatrics University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine

A3. Age-Friendly Healthcare

Age-Friendly Health Systems are changing what it means to age in northern New England with regard to healthcare by focusing on the domains most important to quality healthcare for older people. These include the “4Ms”: mobility, medications, mentation, and what matters. This means making sure older people have a mobility plan when receiving medical care or in long term care; reviewing medications regularly to minimize harm; addressing conditions that affect thinking and are common in older people such as dementia, depression and delirium; and incorporating what matter to the person, such as their values, goals and preferences, into all care plans. Join us to learn more about innovative solutions that emphasize the opinions, concerns, and values of older people and their care partners.

Presenters:
Betsey Rhynhart, Vice President, Population Health, Concord Hospital & Executive Director, NH Accountable Care Partners (Medicare ACO)
Keliane Totten, Vice-President of Community Engagement, Concord Regional Visiting Nurses Association
Tammy A. Vachon, LCSW.  Program Manager,-Geriatric Programs, Partnership for Healthy Aging, Maine Health

A4. Experiential Learning: Identifying opportunities and collaborators for service learning in fall prevention

In this presentation, we will provide guidance on developing partnerships between student programs, community organizations and key stakeholders for service-learning projects that serve the community while enhancing student learning. Considerations for multiple student levels (high school, college, and graduate) and short-term and sustainable projects will be discussed.

Presenters:
Ebony Dukes, CNA. University of New England | Class of 2020 Health Wellness and Occupational Studies Major, Intergenerational Living Student
Jason T. Garbarino DNP, RN-BC, CNL.Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Vermont Department of Nursing
Nancy Gell PT, PhD, MPH.Assistant Professor, Department of Rehabilitation and Movement Science, University of Vermont

A5. Using Qualitative Research to Understand Older People’s Quality of Life and Informal Caregiver Experiences

This is a session designed to engage participants in considering the utility of two qualitative research projects from universities in Vermont and Maine. Qualitative research involves methods that are designed to achieve deeper understanding of authentic experiences. In our case, the focus was on better understanding the authentic experiences of older people and caregivers in rural settings.
What Makes for Good Quality of Life at a Continuing Care Retirement Community?
The University of Vermont study examined the key elements of Quality of Life (QOL) and the main strategies supporting QOL among residents at an independent Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC). This qualitative case study was conducted in collaboration with a team of older residents. Based on an analysis of the forty-five semi-structured interviews of residents and administrators and 109 resident survey responses collected, three key components of QOL were identified; six strategies were defined as key to promoting QOL; and four broad categories of challenges to CCRC success were identified. The identified strategies for promoting QOL are considered in terms of their ability to be incorporated into varied forms of congregate living facilities for older people. Meanwhile, the challenges of competing needs and priorities identified need to be honored and balanced to promote a positive community culture.
Informal Caregiving Experiences of Undergraduates
The University of Maine at Augusta study focused on informal care giving experiences of undergraduate students. National studies have investigated the investments, practices and consequences of informal caregivers of older people. This study addresses gaps in the understanding of informal caregiving on nontraditional undergraduate students in rural states. Survey and focal group data collected during 2016 – 2018 explored the following themes: intentionality and impact of undergraduate elder caregiving and their academic success.

Presenters:
Lynne A. Bond. Professor Emeritus, Department of Psychological Science, The University of Vermont
Kenneth Elliott. Professor of Psychology The University of Maine at Augusta
Jennifer Pratt. Research Analyst University Of Southern Maine, Muskie School Of Public Service, Cutler Institute
Jacqueline S. Weinstock. Associate Professor, Human Development and Family Studies Program, The University of Vermont

Agenda

2:15-3:15 Breakout Session Two

B1. Engagement & Meaning-Making in Later Life: Opportunities in Work, Education and Research

This session will discuss communal engagement and meaning-making in three contexts: employment, lifelong learning, and applied research on healthful aging. The panelists will offer examples from their respective professional roles. Interactive components will demonstrate key concepts and provide  attendees with practical takeaways.

Presenters:
Mary Branagan
. Director of Program & Partner Affairs, Associates for Training and Development (A4TD)
Anne Cardale. Program Director, Maine Senior College Network
Tom Meuser, PhD. Professor & Director, Center for Excellence in Aging & Health
University of New England.

B2. Empowering and enabling aging-in-place through digital technologies

Overcoming the digital divide is a fundamental prerequisite to implementation of digitally supported aging-in-place. The speakers will introduce two novel home-based digital programs that strengthen and augment aging-in-place. The first is an information communication technology training program to facilitate technology adoption and digital competence among older people. The second is a system that supports self-management of health though cueing, tracking and analyzing health at home with timely clinical support provided through telemedicine when needed. Demonstrations and hands-on experience with both programs will be provided. The speakers will include vignettes and role playing activities to stimulate discussion and audience engagement.

Presenters:
Sajay Arthanat
Ph.D., OTR/L., ATP. Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy
College of Health & Human Services, University of New Hampshire
Piali De, PhD.CEO Senscio Systems

B3. Engaging Older Adults in Research: Examples from the Field

This interactive session will provide an overview of three initiatives that have successfully engaged older adults in research and development (R&D) activities: the Maine Initiative for Neurologic Aging and Health (MAINAH), a rural New Hampshire sarcopenia study, and the UMaine Aging Initiative which engages older adults in both clinical and business R&D activities. Presenters will discuss principles of practice for maximizing meaningful engagement of older adults and other community partners in clinical, translational, and technology/product development research as well as the benefits that older adults derive from such participation. The session will conclude with a discussion of how the research community can best engage older adults who may be isolated or otherwise underrepresented in the aging research enterprise.

Presenters:
Jason Aziz, PhD Candidate.USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University; Nutrition, Exercise, Physiology, and Sarcopenia Research Laboratory
Jennifer Crittenden, PhD. Associate Director, University of Maine Center on Aging
Lenard Kaye, DSW/PhD. Director, University of Maine Center on Aging
Jean Mayer. USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University; Nutrition, Exercise,
Physiology, and Sarcopenia Research Laboratory
Astra Chang Schwertschkow, PhD. MAINAH Project Manager, Northern Light Health Clinical Research Center
Cliff Singer, MD. Chief, Geriatric Neuropsychiatry, Northern Light Acadia Hospital

B4. Putting Data and Research to work

This workshop features two examples of putting research to work in the community to make all of our lives a little healthier and to allow us to enjoy the best possible quality of life.

NH Healthy Aging Data Report
The healthy aging data reports include community profiles reporting 120 to 179 indicators at the local and state level. Indicators include: population characteristics, wellness and prevention, nutrition and diet, chronic disease, behavioral health, disability, health services utilization and access, transportation and safety, and economic and housing. The aims of reports were to provide accessible, actionable information on healthy aging to policy makers, local stakeholders, senior service providers, health care providers, foundations, and older people in MA, NH, and RI. “The key effectiveness tool connecting stakeholders to communicates share ideas and resources and supporting to build age-friendly communities in New England states. Check the website of the healthy aging data reports (www.healthyagingdatareprots.org).”
Risks and Resilience: LGBT Older Adults
What does the current gerontological research tell us about LGBT older adults? What is important to  know about how lesbians, gay men, bisexual people and transgender older adults differ? How can we  translate data to inform evidence-based practice and spur policy to advance equity in the field of healthy aging? Join the conversation.

Presenters:
Chae Man (Jay) Lee, PhD. Post-Doc Fellowship, Department of Gerontology at UMASS Boston
Kristen E. Porter, PhD, MA, MAc, LAc, JP.Founder/CEO: The Zen Executive, LLC & AHA Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee

B5. Hearing and Experiencing the Untold Story

Creative approaches to everyday technology tools for engaging the perspectives of a wide range of older adults. We will share our experiences of research studies that included older adults with cognitive impairment, older adults of color, and older adults of language minorities. Be ready to brainstorm, discuss, and try new things, including a virtual reality headset!

Presenters:
Anna Adachi-Mejia, PhD. Associate Professor, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth,
Pronouns: she, her, and hers
Susan Wehry, MD. Chief of Geriatrics, University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine

The Summit will be held at the Courtyard by Marriott, Grappone Conference Center.
Overnight rooms are available for a rate of $139 per night (plus applicable tax).
To secure this rate, please contact the hotel directly at (603) 225-0303 and tell the booking agent that you are with the Tri-State Learning Collaborative on Aging.
Reservations must be made prior to September 26th, 2019.
HINT: If using a GPS system to find the hotel, enter 40 Commercial Street, Concord NH 03301 as the address of the hotel.

Sponsorship Opportunities

This Summit will bring leaders in research, technology, business, health and learning together to highlight this exciting work and leave inspired by what’s possible. The event will also include an opportunity for researchers to hear from policy leaders, innovators in aging, advocates, older adults and funders about emerging research needs in our region that can help us move the needle on unsolved challenges. Support this important regional learning opportunity by sponsoring the event. Gain access to a broad array of thought leaders in the field of health care, higher education, technology and research by exhibiting at the event.

We have sponsorship and exhibiting opportunities available.  If you are interested, please click the link below to sponsor the Age of Possibilities or to exhibit!

Gold Sponsors

Silver Sponsor

Exhibitors

With Gratitude

The Tri-State Learning Collaborative on Aging wishes to thank our funders for their support of Age of Possibilities.